12 Best Eczema Creams 2024, According to Dermatologists


Editor Tip: If you don’t love thick formulas, no sweat—this actually feels more like a gel cream, and sinks in so quickly that you can use it as a hand cream.

Key Ingredients: Squalane, niacinamide, glycerin | Who It’s For: Those seeking versatility

Best Mist: Aquaphor Advanced Therapy Ointment Body Spray

Aquaphor

Aquaphor Advanced Therapy Ointment Body Spray

Why It’s Worth It: A time-saving version of Aquaphor’s original healing ointment, its Advanced Therapy Ointment Body Spray, offers the same skin-softening and protective benefits—minus the thick, somewhat greasy feel that some people can’t get into. Instead, this lightweight spray delivers an even mist that soothes skin upon contact and softens dry or scaly patches, too. New York-based board-certified dermatologist Sejal Shah, MD, recommends it because you can easily spritz, rub it in, and go in one easy motion—and it works just as well as the original.

Editor Tip: Aside from the propellant—which evaporates immediately—this is the same exact formula as the original.

Key Ingredients: Bisabolol, glycerin, panthenol | Who It’s For: Those who prefer more lightweight textures

Best Hypoallergenic: Vanicream Moisturizing Cream

Vanicream

Vanicream Moisturizing Cream

Why It’s Worth It: Britt Craiglow, MD, a board-certified dermatologist in Fairfield, CT, suggests Vanicream as a non-greasy eczema treatment that “provides excellent barrier protection.” Craiglow also notes that Vanicream is free of common contact allergens, making it an even better choice for people with extra-sensitive skin. It hydrates and soothes the skin’s barrier, without any dyes or fragrances to worry about.

Editor Tip: While the formula is non-comedogenic, meaning it won’t clog pores, those with oily skin might prefer the brand’s Daily Facial Moisturizer.

Key Ingredients: Petrolatum, sorbitol, simethicone | Who It’s For: People with contact dermatitis


Can adults get eczema?

Although eczema is common in babies, adults can develop eczema, too. No matter what age you develop eczema, one thing is clear: “We can’t cure eczema, but we can keep it under control,” says Joshua Zeichner, MD, a board-certified dermatologist in New York City. To figure out the most comprehensive treatment plan for eczema-prone skin, it’s best to talk to a board-certified dermatologist who can prescribe topical steroids and creams that will fight the uncomfortable itchiness and irritation that are synonymous with eczema. But if you have milder symptoms and/or want to use something in conjunction with prescription creams, many over-the-counter products help soothe symptoms.

What ingredients should I look for in eczema creams?

New York City-based board-certified dermatologist Kenneth Mark, MD suggests looking for creams that contain soothing, itch-relieving ingredients for eczema, such as colloidal oatmeal, aloe, vitamin E, hydrocortisone, and green tea. Emollients such as petrolatum can also help to lock in moisture and repair the skin barrier, as can humectants, which draw water into skin. What to avoid? Irritants like drying, alcohol-based gels, and fragrances. “For all ages, moisturizing and supporting the skin barrier is the mainstay of maintenance,” Hadley King, a board-certified dermatologist in New York City, previously told Allure.

Meet the experts

  • Scott Paviol, MD, a board-certified dermatologist in Charlotte, North Carolina
  • Sejal Shah, MD, a board-certified dermatologist in New York City at SmarterSkin Dermatology
  • Nava Greenfield, MD, a board-certified dermatologist in New York City at Schweiger Dermatology Group
  • Adam Friedman, MD, a board-certified dermatologist in Washington, D.C and professor at George Washington School of Medicine
  • Jennifer Segal, MD, a Houston-based board-certified dermatologist at Metropolitan Dermatology Institute
  • Marisa Garshick, MD, a board-certified dermatologist based in New York City at MDCS NYC
  • Michele Green, MD, a board-certified dermatologist in New York City
  • Anthony Rossi, MD, a board-certified dermatologist in New York City at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
  • Robert Finney, MD, a board-certified dermatologist based in New York City at Soho Skin & Hair
  • Joshua Zeichner, MD, a board-certified dermatologist, associate professor of dermatology, and the director of cosmetic & clinical research in dermatology at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City and
  • Kenneth Mark, MD, a board-certified dermatologist in New York City
  • Britt Craiglow, MD, a board-certified dermatologist in Fairfield, CT at Dermatology Physicians of Connecticut

How we review and test products

When Allure tests a product, our editors look at it from every angle in an effort to best serve you. We review ingredients, scrutinize brand claims, and, when necessary, examine peer-reviewed scientific and medical studies. In addition to testing each and every product that’s included in each and every review, we rely on experts who shape their fields, including dermatology, cosmetic chemistry, and medicine, to help us vet the ingredients and formulas.





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